6 things I’ve learned in my first 6 months as a reporter

It’s been six months since I’ve started my first “real” job as a digital reporter at my hometown newspaper, the Kearney Hub.

Six months! Where does the time go? I’ve learned a lot in that time–things about myself, the world world and the profession/industry of small-town journalism.

Here are my six biggest takeaways from the journalism side of things.

  1. Every journo has a great story (or seven).
    Whether it’s a story they broke or a funny detail from an interview, a group of reporters has seen it all. I love listening to veteran journalists talk about their careers, from things such as covering the county fair to murder cases.

    It’s also interesting to see who they have interviewed, from lawmakers to celebrities such as Taylor Swift and Ellen DeGeneres. (So far, the most famous person I’ve interviewed is Justin Moore. And the Lincoln kid who got stuck in a claw machine. I met him and his grandfather at the scene of a playground fire in Omaha. The interview didn’t make it in the story, but the kid was pretty cute.)

  2. In addition to reporting, I work on the digital side of things. This ranges from web management to taking videos to implementing the social media plan. Here’s the thing about social media–it’s a lot harder than it seems. I thought my past experiences managing social media campaigns prepared me for this, but I was wrong.

    It takes a lot of time and a lot of creativity/wordsmithing. It takes some of the fun out of social media. My Tweetdeck and Facebook pages are up all day at work, and at the end of the day, I never want to look at Facebook again. But not Twitter–I’m addicted to Twitter.

  3. “Regular” people are very interesting. Oftentimes, they aren’t “regular” at all. I’ve met some phenomenal individuals–selfless athletes, a generous seamstress, a gregarious breast cancer survivor–and written stories about their lives. The process fascinates me. It’s bizarre to sit down with a person you’ve never met and have this emotional experience where they tell you their hopes and dreams and the intimate details of their life. Then, when the interview is over, you will say goodbye and probably never talk again. It’s very strange.
  4. There are a lot of good writers in the world. Look at a newspaper, be it the Hub, the Omaha World-Herald or the New York Times–the pages are filled with superb reporting and writing. But good writers are not necessarily great communicators. This surprised me. I first experienced this as an intern, but figured it was because I wasn’t a full-fledged employee. Actually, it’s like that everywhere, in every field–sometimes communication breaks down. Who knew?
  5. I imagine that being a reporter is like working in sales: it takes a lot of initiative. You have to call people on the phone (something my fellow millennials despise) or, if you are ignored, show up at their place of business. Aren’t there? Maybe you have to leave a note and business card in their mailbox.

    You have to pitch your idea to a source, get them to agree, and then have them tell you all the details of their life. Sometimes, individuals or businesses will turn you down, declining to participate. (That always baffles me.) Some stories are magical. They grab your attention and spill out of your brain so quickly your fingers can’t keep up. Others aren’t so captivating, but still need to be shared.
    (One difference between sales and daily reporting–there is no commission.)

  6. I like making people feel emotions. I get a strange satisfaction when I learn that people were moved by something I wrote. If you aren’t in the news business, chances are a reporter is invisible to you. So when I read internet comments such as “(subject of the story), you made me cry,” I feel like I’ve doubly won–I’ve told the story in an unobtrusive way and I elicited a response from a reader. There’s nothing quite like it.

Bonus thing I’ve learned: Everyone should want to be a reporter. It’s awesome.

Bonus skill I’ve learned: How to type while holding a pen.

Are you a reporter/journalist/work in the media biz? What did you learn in your first six months on the job?

Not in the business? What did you learn when starting out in your job?

 

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2 thoughts on “6 things I’ve learned in my first 6 months as a reporter

  1. DIY April February 14, 2015 / 2:58 PM

    I was running late for the governor’s address at the Capitol in Lincoln. I went to take off my coat when I heard the gavel… thank God!.

    I was wearing cheap Jordache pants handed down from my aunt. When I bent over to set the tripod up, my pants split wide open all the way down the back, which was facing the floor. It was so loud that Mike DiGiacomo, with KETV, asked if I’d been shot. We laughed hysterically.

    p.s. – I would have moved to another country if my derriere was exposed. Fortunately, My coat was three-quarter length.

    • Amanda Brandt July 16, 2015 / 9:15 PM

      Oh my gosh. How did this comment slip through the cracks?? (No pun intended!) That is so hilarious but I would have turned lobster red!! Still no wardrobe malfunctions….yet. Thanks for reading!

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